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Celebrating the 20th Anniversary of the Rotary Tanzania Project

How a chance meeting has changed thousands of lives

Who would have thought that a chance meeting in an airport lounge between a New Zealand Government official and Faye Cran, a Rotarian from Arusha in Tanzania, would result in a 20-year partnership that has transformed the lives of thousands of families in rural Tanzania?

Since that serendipitous meeting, Rotary New Zealand and Rotary in Tanzania with some support from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade have completed a huge number of projects and activities.

The projects have been very varied and could not have been run successfully without input from the many Rotarians and other volunteers from both countries who have given so generously of their time and expertise. Among them have been dairy farmers, horticulturalists, engineers, fundraisers, project managers, accountants and builders.

The first project helped those with leprosy at Upendo Leprosy Rehabilitation Centre at Maji ya Chai by building homes for them and installing solar panels.

The next were fruit and vegetable markets in Tengeru and Mwika where thousands of people come to buy and sell produce, some travelling from as far away as Kenya, Uganda and Burundi. 

The Kondiki Dairy is a project that continues to grow. Conceived in 2008, it collects, pasteurises and distributes milk. Currently, 3000 litres of milk are processed for 600 farmers four days a week and the demand is increasing. Herd size is very small by New Zealand standards. Generally each farmer, the majority of them women, has between 5 and 10 cows. The Dairy enables them to process the milk hygienically and economically and alongside, the farmers learn more about animal husbandry and new farming methods.



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Dev Manik*

Dev Manik*

JB Munro*

JB Munro*

Lucy Renju

Lucy Renju

Sadikiel Kimaro

Sadikiel Kimaro

FayE Cran

FayE Cran

John Somerville*

John Somerville*

Merv Huxford

Merv Huxford

Sister Magna

Sister Magna

Geoff Mathis

Geoff Mathis

Keith Stanton

Keith Stanton

Mike Jaduram

Mike Jaduram

Stuart Batty

Stuart Batty

Jack Holder*

Jack Holder*

Kinai Remmy

Kinai Remmy

Rod Finch

Rod Finch

Tony Manning

Tony Manning

 

Dozens of smaller projects have made a big difference to the day-to-day living of those in the target communities.

Biogas digesters have been installed to convert cow manure into methane. The clean, renewable fuel can be used in homes for cooking and lighting.

Sanitation in schools has been improved.

Community health centres have had their facilities and infrastructure upgraded.

There are new water harvesting systems and water tanks.

There is more support available to help improve livelihoods such as training on how to grow vegetables more efficiently and care for farm animals.

While a lot has been achieved, there are many more projects in the pipeline that require funding and resourcing. We thank all Rotarians and others for their gifts of time, money and expertise to the Tanzanian projects. To mark this milestone we would like to thank in particular our volunteers.

* These committed volunteers are now deceased.

“From a small seed a mighty trunk may grow.” Aeschylus